By Joanna Perry | Head of Marketing

There's a lot of talk about content marketing; it's a buzz phrase that is often used as a catch-all for tweets, posts, editorial, homepages and videos. 

Retailers want their content to be sticky and for their videos to go viral. But how many formulate their content to be relevant to the end consumer at each point in their path to conversion?

More often than not, retailers are not optimising their content for relevance to the consumer. With so much noise in the market, it's necessary to make your content stand out at the right point in time, to the right consumer. 

Keep in mind the customer journey and that content plays a part at every phase. Content strategy goes beyond your editorial calendar for the inspiration or trend page on your ecommerce site. This chart shows an example customer experience, where you can see many touchpoints at each phase of the journey:

An example of best practice content Ted Baker holiday shop

Determining where content should be served depends on matching the purpose of the content with the correct phase in the shopper journey. For example:

  • Customers will want to interact with style guides, product edits or other inspirational content during the awareness phase. 
  • Customers will interact with landing page content as they are narrowing their search during the research phase.
  • When a customer is considering which product to purchase, detailed product descriptions will help the customer make an informed decision.
  • Ted Baker's Holiday Shop campaign is a great example of a consistent customer experience that serves relevant content to the end consumer.

 

An example of best practice content Ted Baker holiday shop

Email, Facebook, and Homepage. 

The Ted Baker Holiday Shop has various points of entry. This is inspirational content that can be accessed via their homepage, email, or Facebook. 

An example of best practice content Ted Baker holiday shop

Holiday Shop > Shop Women ; Holiday Shop > Interactive Content Hub

The navigation of the above entry points lets the customer select their destination, depending on the phase within their customer journey: whether they want to shop the product (consideration phase), or whether they want to explore the editorial content (inspiration and research phase). 

A point of difference in this example is that Ted Baker lets the customer easily toggle between the inspiration and product focused content. The strong call to action on the first grid position for the Holiday Shop doesn't distract from the product, but gives continuity to the experience and highlights another option in the customer journey. 

The consistency of messaging and imagery paired with the seamless customer journey exemplify a well thought out content strategy. 

With so much investment in content creation, how can you make it work harder for your business? For more, check out the article Content for Commerce, where we examine:

  • What makes great content?
  • Who is responsible for content?
  • How do you measure success?

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